A Prezi about Edgar Schein’s work… (click play, more and full screen)…

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Edgar Schein’s Process Consultation (Prezi presentation, click more and full screen).

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Edgar Schein on corporate culture

From the Globe and Mail, Karl Moore talks with Edgar Schein about corporate culture…

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Edgar Schein video: 30 Years of OD History

Geoff Bellman, Edgar Schein, Roger Harrison, Marv Weisbord, and Don Swartz, the founder of the OSR program, discuss their involvement in the last 30 years of organization development at the OSR graduate program at Seattle University on October 20, 2009.

Part #1 (Ed Schein begins to talk at min 7).

Part #2 (Ed Schein finsh at min 2’50).

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Prof. Edgar Schein – Key note speech about culture and helping…

This is a three part video of Ed Schein’s key note speech about leadership, organizational culture, helping and trust…

Key note speech part 1

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Ed Schein talks about ‘cultural islands’ in organizations and how they need to be aligned for better understanding…

Transcript: Ed Schein talks to Karl Moore
The MIT professor discusses the idea of ‘cultural islands’ in organizations and how they need to be aligned for better understanding
Karl MooreSpecial to Globe and Mail Update
Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2010 01:03PM EDT
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KARL MOORE: This is Karl Moore of the Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University, talking management for The Globe and Mail. Today I am delighted to speak to Ed Schein who is a senior professor at MIT and has written about change for many, many years now. Good morning Ed.
ED SCHEIN: Good morning.
KM: One of the things that you are best known for is your understanding of writing, research and corporate culture. What have you come to about corporate culture these days? What are you thinking about it?
ES: What are my thoughts about corporate culture? I have just finished revising one of my two books on that subject and I am in the middle of revising the other. The biggest learning that I have had that is forcing me to change the focus is that occupations have cultures, nations have cultures, ethnic groups have cultures and with globalization it is not just going to be about organizational culture.
For example, in many organizations, the dilemma between engineering, finance and marketing is much greater than the problem of their overall corporate culture. In medicine, for example, the conflict between the nursing culture and the doctor culture and the administrator culture is much more of an issue than what is the corporate culture of the whole hospital system.
So, in rewriting I am pushing toward these subculture issues as being the real problem. Then, when you take that into the international scene, you not only have occupational subcultures, but you have the national cultures; you have the doctor from India and the nurse from some other country in a hospital run in the U.S. and all of this has to somehow come together.
I have begun to think about this notion of cultural islands. Where can you actually get multicultural units into a talking relationship with each other so that they can begin to explore their common ground? It is not going to happen in the daily work scene. I think that we have to create cultural islands to allow that kind of communication to occur.
KM: So for a general manager, they need to become bicultural, tri-cultural and really understand the world of the marketing people, the finance people.
ES: They do not have to actually understand those cultures; what they have to be able to do is create settings where those cultures will understand each other enough to get aligned. You are never going to integrate all of these cultures but you have got to get them aligned and get them working toward the same purpose. So the good general manager understands this and creates forums, such as taking everybody to Japan, to allow the communication to occur.
KM: How often should an organization change its culture?
ES: It should not change its culture at all. It should work out its business problems.
KM: That would lead to a corporate culture change.
ES: Well, usually the culture is what the corporation has learned that has made it successful. So the culture is mostly your strength; so you only want to change it when you have a business problem and the culture is what is in the way. Most of the time, even with [New York’s] Consolidated Edison, they are calling all of this culture change, but most of the culture of Con Edison is intact, as evidenced by their ability, for example, to train 10,000 people in a few months on what is a hazard. That sort of training-oriented, top down, is the essence of their culture and without that they would be a much worse organization. The idea of culture change for its own sake is nonsense.
KM: This has been Karl Moore of the Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University, talking management for The Globe and Mail. Today I have been speaking with Ed Schein, a senior professor at MIT.

schein-MITTranscript: Ed Schein talks to Karl Moore.

The MIT professor discusses the idea of ‘cultural islands’ in organizations and how they need to be aligned for better understanding.

Karl Moore | Special to Globe and Mail

Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2010 01:03PM EDT

KARL MOORE: This is Karl Moore of the Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University, talking management for The Globe and Mail. Today I am delighted to speak to Ed Schein who is a senior professor at MIT and has written about change for many, many years now. Good morning Ed.

ED SCHEIN: Good morning.

KM: One of the things that you are best known for is your understanding of writing, research and corporate culture. What have you come to about corporate culture these days? What are you thinking about it?

ES: What are my thoughts about corporate culture? I have just finished revising one of my two books on that subject and I am in the middle of revising the other. The biggest learning that I have had that is forcing me to change the focus is that occupations have cultures, nations have cultures, ethnic groups have cultures and with globalization it is not just going to be about organizational culture. Continue reading

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The Invention of Lying and Goffman…

Today somebody reminded me this movie, and when I first watched the movie I made the connection with Canadian sociologist Erving Goffman work on face.

Goffman discovered that, when an individual comes in contact with other people, that individual will attempt to control or guide the impression that others might make of him by changing or fixing his or her setting, appearance and manner. At the same time, the person that the individual is interacting with is trying to form and obtain information about the individual. Continue reading

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On Check-in as Dialog practice and The Empathy Walk…

During last week at Cape Cod Institute (CCI), attending Intentional Use of Self: Strategies and Skills for Consulting, Coaching and Change with Edith and Charles Seashore (The Seashores), we become resourceful practicing check-ins and check-outs, at the begining and at the end of the 5 sessions of the course… As one participant put it, the course could be named “Check-in / Check-out” : )

Well, I revisited Schein´s article “Kurt Lewin’s Change Theory in the Field and in the Classroom: Notes Toward a Model of Managed Learning” where he talks about the practice of check in / check out and the effects of this on the group. Read by yourself: Continue reading

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Schein y la paradoja de la ansiedad en el aprendizaje…

Las organizaciones actualmente se desempeñan en entornos de alta competitividad y creciente globalización, caracterizados por constantes cambios a ritmos muy acelerados, con la necesidad de integrar una creciente diversidad de perspectivas y enfoques y un diseño organizacional cada vez más plano y menos jerárquico. Un elemento de importancia crítica para asegurar el éxito y la existencia misma de las organizaciones en dichos entornos, es su capacidad de generar cambios y aprendizajes. Sin embargo, contrario a la conceptualización popular del cambio y aprendizaje individual y organizacional como algo deseado, fácil y divertido, bajo el enfoque de Edgar H. Schein más bien estos sólo resultan de un proceso largo y complejo de crear el medio ambiente propicio para el cambio y aprendizaje de personas y organizaciones, el cual es inevitablemente doloroso y difícil de alcanzar.

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Consultoría de procesos como una filosofía de ayuda a sistemas humanos…

¿Cómo proporcionamos ayuda a los demás? ¿Cómo respondemos ante peticiones de ayuda, que roles tomamos? ¿Estos roles son los mas apropiados? ¿Cuáles son las diferentes opciones disponibles que podemos aprender para participar efectivamente en una relación de ayuda?

Los procesos de ayuda aplican a padres, amigos, maestros y administradores, no solo a consultores o terapeutas quienes evidentemente tienen la función de ayudar. El aportar ayuda involucra tomar cierta opción o rol en quien ayuda, de esta manera, algunas veces actuamos como expertos, aportando la respuesta correcta. En otras ocasiones actuamos como doctores, diagnosticando cual es el problema. En otras situaciones, intervenimos en la relación de ayuda como “consultores de procesos”, indagando y escuchando a quien solicita la ayuda.

La consultoría de procesos (CP) es una orientación y una actitud hacia el proceso de ayuda, desarrollado por Edgar H. Schein, profesor del Sloan School of Management del MIT y abordada desde 1969 en tres de sus obras principales sobre el tema: Continue reading

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